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A goat for each son martyred

'Goats' is a new work in which Syrian playwright and documentary filmmaker Liwaa Yazji explores the lies we choose to believe and the effectof one man questioning the ‘truth’.
from Royal Court on Dec 18, 2017.
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The lore of The Jungle

'The Jungle' is an exciting, vibrant portrayal of life in the Calais encampment set up by refugees and migrants as a staging post for their hoped-for journey to Britain.
from Daniel Nelson on Dec 17, 2017.
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Covered by OneWorld

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From the editor

 

 

 

* Mid-December marks the end of most public events about Africa, Asia and Latin America as we prepare for Christmas immersion, the rest of the world fades away and mass entertainment goes childlike and "seasonal". In cinemas, however, there's a last burst this week when three fascinating foreign films take to the screen:

+ Mountains May Depart, a Chinese story of love, rejection, divorce and migration set between 1999 and 2025 that "examines the effect of putting financial considerations ahead of emotional relationships"

+ An intimate family epic as China moves from Confucius to capital

+ The Prince of Nothingwood, a celebration of Afghanistan's most flamboyant film actor, director and producer that shows a rarely seen aspect of the country

+ Hollywood. Bollywood. Nothingwood

+ Youth, a group of young girls are recruited into the People's Liberation Army’s dance troupe, only to find their dreams shattered as Chairman Mao dies and the country goes into chaos

+ An army dance troupe view of China

The Prince of Nothingwood

* On stage, January productions include

+ Into The Numbers, commemorating the 80th anniversary of the Nanking massacre, "a thrillingly innovative theatrical exploration of the philosophical and psychological implications of researching genocide, as well as the toll media saturation plays in the process", at the Finborough Theatre (followed in February and March by two plays about Palestine-Israel, Returning to Haifa and Checkpoint Chana)

 

+ Sugar Baby, "a journey to the dark soul of the food industry", Tristan Bates Theatre

 

+ The Brothers Size, an interpretation of West African myths, Young Vic

 

* The Believers Are But Brothers, Javaad Alipoor explores the smoke and mirrors world of online extremism, anonymity and hate speech, Bush Theatre.

 

 

* Meanhile, this month a global cast that includes actors from Afghanistan, Algeria, Eritrea, Iran, Sudan, Syria, the UK and Zimbabwe - some with refugee backgrounds -  has been assembled  for The Jungle,  at the Young Vic. A number of the actors came through Europe’s largest unofficial refugee camp, which at its peak was a temporary home to more than 10,000 people, many desperate to find a way to enter the UK. The play "tells stories of loss, fear, community and hope, of the camp’s creation and of its destruction – and of the many intense, moving and sometimes hilarious encounters between the refugees from many different countries and the volunteers who arrived from the UK". The writers, Joe Robertson and Joe Murphy, are the joint artistic directors of the Good Chance Theatre that was originally based in the ‘Jungle’ in Calais and then in the north of Paris next to the refugee welcome centre for the first half of 2017. Ten per cent of tickets for The Jungle will be offered to refugees.

 

 

OSLO (poster below right) tells the true story - or more precisely, a version of the true story - of how one young couple, Norwegian diplomat Mona Juul (currently ambassador to the UK) and her husband, social scientist Terje Rød-Larsen, planned and orchestrated top-secret, high-level meetings between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organisation, which culminated in the signing of the 1993 Oslo Accords.  Oslo is both a political thriller and the personal story of a small band of women and men struggling together – and fighting each other – as they seek to change the world.

Oslo

 

 


Daniel Nelson

Editor

events@oneworld.org

Tw: @EventsNelson

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TALKS AND MEETINGS 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking ahead to January (a full listing will appear soon)

 

 

Wednesday 10 January

* Migration in Poetry, Saphra, Norbert Hirschhorn and Arnold Jansen op de Haar, 8pm, National Poetry Library, Level 5, Blue side, Royal Festival Hall. Info: Tickets

 

Friday 12 January

* The power of belief: Can religion be separated from politics?, Mukulika Banerjee, Diarmaid MacCulloch, Gideon Rachman, 6.30pm, £10/£8, The British Museum, Great Russell Street, WC1. Info: Power of belief

 

Monday 15 January 

* Geographic information and sustainability, Andy Tatem on how cell phone and satellite technologies offer new ways to help achieve and monitor the Sustainable Development Goals, Royal Geographical Society, 1 Kensington Gore, SW7. Info: 7591 3000

* Understanding refugee and migrant journeys to Europe, Heaven Crawley, Joanne Liu, Jessica Hagen-Zanker, Ahmad Al-Rahid, 6-7.30pm, free, Overseas Development Institute, 203 Blackfriars Road, SE1. Info: 7922 0300/ odi@odi.org

 

Tuesday 16 January

* Measuring the hard to measure in development, Samuel Addai-Boateng, Kate Dyer, Tiina Pasanen, Catherine Harbour, 4-5.30pm, Overseas Development Institute, 203 Blackfriars Road, SE1. Info: 7922 0300/ odi@odi.org

* Jewish Education in Eastern Europe, conference, £15/£10, Polish embassy. Info: https://jewisheducation.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Wednesday 17 January

* Culture under Fire, Helen Frowe, Issam Kourbaj, Vernon Rapley, Eleanor Robson, Sarah Fine, 6:30-8pm, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, WC2. Info: 7405 7686

* Justice Delayed, Justice Redeemed? Transitional Justice in the Arab Region, Noha Aboueldahab, 6pm, MBI Al Jaber Building, 21 Russell Square, WC1. Info: vp6@soas.ac.uk/ 7898 4330

 

Thursday 18 January

* Turbulent Climate Change: why we need to address injustice, Mary Robinson, 6:30-8pm, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, WC2. Info: 7405 7686

 

 

 

 

EXHIBITIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Escaping Wars and Waves, Olivier Kugler's reportage illustrations document the experiences of Syrian refugees in Iraqi Kurdistan, Greece, Calais, England and Germany, winning the World Illustration Award 2015. All prints are for sale, with half  the profits donated to Médecins Sans Frontières, Rich Mix, 35-47 Bethnal Green Road, E1, until 7 January. Info: 7613 7498/ boxoffice@richmix.org.uk

 

The Chapel, Michael Armitage's large-scale paintings explore the ambiguous boundaries between religion, folklore and social consensus, particularly in relation to issues of mental health in East Africa, South London Gallery, 65-67 Peckham Road, SE5, until 23 February. Info: 7703 6120/  mail@southlondongallery.org

 

*  Age of Terror: Art Since 9/11, exhibition showcasing over 40 contemporary artists’ responses to war and conflict since the terrorist attacks, from artists including Ai Weiwei, Grayson Perry, Gerhard Richter, Jenny Holzer, Mona Hatoum, Alfredo Jaar, Coco Fusco and Jake & Dinos Chapman, £15/ £10.50/child £7.50/ National Art Pass £7.50, Imperial War Museum, Lambeth Road, SE1, until 28 May. Info: 7416 5000

+ Art in an age of terror

 

John Akomfrah: Purple, immersive six-channel video installation addressing climate change, human communities and the wilderness, free, Barbican, Silk Street, until 7 June. Info: 7638 8891/ Purple

 

* No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain, art, photography and personal stories, Migration Museum at the Workshop, free, 26 Lambeth High Street, SE1, until 25 February. Info: http://www.migrationmuseum.org

+ Migration moments to remember

 

* Wildlife Photographer of the Year, £13.50/£12.50/£8/£7, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, SW7, until 28 May. Info: 7942 5000

 

Hassan Hajjaj: La Caravane, the British-Moroccan artist's "blend of the glossy aesthetic of a fashion shoot with Moroccan tradition and street culture ...  witty and poignant images, although outwardly light-hearted, challenge Western perceptions of the hijab and female disempowerment", free, Somerset House, Strand, WC2, until 7 January. Info: 7845 4600/  visitor@somersethouse.org.uk

 

* lluminating India, season of exhibitions and eventst celebrating India's contribution to science, technology and maths, free. Includes Photography 1857-2017, and 5,000 Years of Science and Innovation. Science Museum, Cromwell Road, SW7, until 31 March. Info: 7942 4000

+ 5,000 years of Indian science history on display

 

* Ayurvedic Man: Encounters With Indian Medicine, mapping encounters between medical practitioners, cultures, and continents - across India and beyond, Wellcome Foundation, 183 Euston Road, NW1, until 8 April. Info: 7611 2222/ info@wellcomecollection.org

 

* Rapid Response Collecting, tiny but fascinating exhibit of new acquisitions that ranges from a Ghanaian "power bank phone" to shoes that show Western designers' belated realisation that the pink colour 'nude' did not apply to all the world's population, free, Victoria & Albert Museum, Cromwell Road

+ Burkinis and bullets at the V&A

 

London, Sugar & Slavery , permanent gallery at the Museum of Docklands, No 1 Warehouse, West India Quay, E14. Info: info@museumoflondon.org.uk

 

The City Is Ours, global challenges, local innovations, free, Museum of London, 150 London Wall, EC2, until 2 January. Info: Exhibition

This could have been a slicker city

 

atmosphere: exploring climate science, free, Science Museum, South Kensington. Info: Museum

 

Atlantic Worlds, transatlantic slave trade gallery, National Maritime Museum, Park Row, SE1. Info: 8858 4422/ 8312 656

 

* Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, National Portrait Gallery, St Martin's Place, WC2, until 6 February. Info: 7306 0055/ npg.org.uk

+ Refugees and androids steal the show

+ Taylor Wessing prize: who is the main in the photograph?

 

 

 

from Thursday 25 January

* Andreas Gursky Exhibition, the German photographer large-scale pictures portraying emblematic sites and scenes of the global economy and contemporary life, £16, conc available, Hayward Gallery, Southbank, Belvedere Road, SE1, until 22 April. Info: customer@southbankcentre.co.uk/ 3879 9555

 

 

Photo: "Newsroom, political platform, local hot spot, confession box, preacher-pulpit and football stadium. For generations, African men have gathered in barber shops to discuss the world. These are places where the banter can be barbed and the truth is always telling": Barbershop Chronicles is back at the National Theatre.

Barber Shop Chronicles

 

 

 

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FILM

 

 

 

 

* Mountains May Depart, director Jia Zhangke says the impulse behind the film - set between 1999 and 20250 - "is to examine the effect of putting financial considerations ahead of emotional relationships", ICA, until 19 December, Curzon Bloomsbury, Barbican

+ An intimate family epic as China moves from Confucius to capital

 

* The Prince of Nothingwood, wonderful and bizarre celebration of Afghanistan's extravagantly flamboyant film actor, director and producer, and an unusual perspective on a little-known aspect of the country, ICA, until 21 December; Barbican, Cine Lumiere,  Picturehouse Central, Brixton Ritzy, Hackney Picturehouse

+ Hollywood. Bollywood. Nothingwood.

 

* Youth, a group of young girls are recruited into the People Liberation Authority’s dance troupe, only to find their dreams shattered as Chairman Mao dies and the country goes into chaos; the film spans the end of the Cultural Revolution to the 1990s, Odeon Panton Street

+ An army dance troupe view of China

 

Jane, the story of British primatologist Jane Goodall's work on chimpanzees, £9/£7/£5, Curzon Bloomsbury, ICA until 21 December.

 

Human Flow, artist and activist Ai Weiwei's take on the global refugee crisis, Curzon Bloomsbury, until 21  December; 18 Dec, Regent Street Cinema

'They're usually either enemies or victims': the refugee crisis on screen 

 

* Bingo! The King of the Mornings, heavy-handed, self-regarding film "based on the true story" of Augusto, an irreverent Brazilian actor searching for his place in the spotlight," Rich Mix

 

from Friday 22 December

* Taste of CementBeirut, Syrian construction workers in Beirut are building a skyscraper while their own houses at home are being shelled, ICA, until 2 January.

 

Friday 22-Saturday 23 December

* The Prince of Nothingwood, a celebration of Afghanistan's extravagantly flamboyant film actor, director and producer, Curzon Bloomsbury

.+ Hollywood. Bollywood. Nothingwood.

 

Saturday 23 December

* The World of Apu, Soumitra Chatterjee features in the title role in the concluding part of Satyajit Ray’s trilogy, 5.40pm, BFI Southbank

 

from Sunday 24 December

* In Between, three young Arab-Israeli women sharing a flat in Tel Aviv  try to find a way to enjoy the freedom that the city offers without having to turn their backs to their more conservative families, and tradition. JW3, until 3 December. Info: info@ukjewishfilm.org

 

Wednesday 27 December

* Human Flow, Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei's take on migration + pre-recorded Q&A, 3pm, Curzon Soho

* The Eagle Huntress, follows 13-year-old Aisholpan, who causes a stir among her Kazakh tribe by pursuing her dream despite objections from the elders, to become a female eagle hunter in Mongolia against all odds, 4.30pm, Curzon Bloomsbury

 

Friday 29 December

* City of Ghosts, gripping documentary about how a handful of anonymous Syrian activists banded together to report on events in Raqaa after their city was taken over by ISIS, 4.30pm, Curzon Bloomsbury

+ The crazy bravery of the Syrian phone fighters

* Letters From Baghdad, the story of explorer, writer, and spy Gertrude Bell who shaped the modern Middle East, becoming one of the most important women in the British Empire, 6.30pm, Curzon Bloomsbury

 

from Friday 29 December

* The Future Perfect the journey of a Chinese immigrant who joins her close-knit family in Buenos Aires with no Spanish language skills, ICA, until 3 January.

 

Saturday 30  December, Monday 1 January

* The Eagle Huntress, follows 13-year-old Aisholpan, who causes a stir among her Kazakh tribe by pursuing her dream despite objections from the elders, to become a female eagle huntress in Mongolia against all odds, 6.30pm, Curzon Bloomsbury

 

Monday 1 & Wednesday 3 January

* Letters From Baghdad, the story of explorer, writer, and spy Gertrude Bell who shaped the modern Middle East, becoming one of the most important women in the British Empire, 01/01: 8.30pm, 03/01: 4.30pm, Curzon Bloomsbury

 

Tuesday 2 & Thursday 4 January

* City of Ghosts, gripping documentary about how a handful of anonymous Syrian activists banded together to report on events in Raqaa after their city was taken over by ISIS, 2/01: 4.30pm, 4/01: 8.30pm, Curzon Bloomsbury

+ The Crazy bravery of the Syrian phone fighters

 

 

 

 

 

PERFORMANCE

 

 

 

 

* Oslo, the true story of two maverick Norwegian diplomats whose quiet heroics led to the Oslo Peace Accords, Harold Pinter Theatre, Panton Street, SW1, until 30 December. Info: 0844 871 7627

+ The Oslo agreement: when the personal became political

 

Barber Shop Chronicles, Inua Ellams conjures up a barber shop teeming with African anecdotes and arguments, £15-£35, National Theatre, South Bank, SE1, until 9 January. Info: 7452 3000/ http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk 

 

* Goats, new work by Syrian playwright and documentary filmmaker Liwaa Yazji, Royal Court Theatre, Sloane, Square, SW1, until 30 December. Info: 7565 5000/ www.royalcourttheatre.com

+ When a goat is a rewaed for a martyr's family

 

* Parliament Square, Kat gets up one morning, leaves her family and travels to London to carry out an act that will change her life and, she hopes, everyone else’s. But what, in the end, are the real consequences of her actions?, Bush Theatre, 7 Uxbridge Road, W12, until 6 January. Info: 8743 5050

 

* The Melting Pot, originally performed in New York in 1908, this is classic story of a young Russian immigrant fighting to uphold his dream of life in a new country, Finborough Theatre, 118 Finborough Road, SW10, until 19 December. Info: 512 609614

 

* The Jungle, powerful play about the migrants' camp in Calais, by Joe Robertson and Joe Murphy, the joint-artistic directors of the Good Chance Theatre that was originally based in the camp, Young Vic, 66 The Cut, SE1, until 6 January. Info: 7922 2922/ The Jungle

+ The lore of The Jungle

 

from Tuesday 2 January

* Into The Numbers, "a thrillingly innovative theatrical exploration of the philosophical and psychological implications of researching genocide, as well as the toll media saturation plays in the process", Finborough Theatre, 118 Finborough Road, SW10. Info: 0844 847 1652/ www.finboroughtheatre.co.uk

 

 

 

 

TV AND RADIO 

 

 

 

Monday 18 December

* Panorama: Myanmar - The Hiudden Truth, the Rohingya crisis, 7.30pm, BBC1

* Mexico: Earth's Festival of Life, desert wildlife, 8pm, midnight30, BBC4

* The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers, 9pm, 1.30am, BBC4

* Crossing Continents, 8.30pm, R4

 

Tuesday 19 December

* Mexico: Earth's Festival of Life, desert wildlife, midnight30, BBC4

* Black Music in Europe: A Hidden History, 9am, 9.30pm, R4

* Late Junction: Black Music in Europe Before Windrush, 11pm, R3

 

Wednesday 20 December

* Dian Fossey: Secrets in the Mist, last in doc series on the primatologist, 9pm, National Geographic

 

Thursday 21 December

* Crossing Continents, 11am, R4

 

Friday 22 December

* Panorama: Myanmar - The Hiudden Truth, the Rohingya crisis, midnight40pm, BBC2

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